Eva Gardner: Playing For The Stars

Bass triple-threat Eva Gardner unveils an album that reveals the musical mind of someone who’s anchored everyone from Cher to the Mars Volta

Eva Gardner: Playing For The Stars

Bass triple-threat Eva Gardner unveils an album that reveals the musical mind of someone who’s anchored everyone from Cher to the Mars Volta

Photo by Lynda Buchanan For two years straight, Eva Gardner has been out on tour relentlessly traveling the globe to deliver pop star Pink’s larger-than-life acrobatic stage show to the masses, in support of her 2017 release Beautiful Trauma. While television appearances, sold-out arenas, jet-lagged flights, and long bus commutes have been the bulk of Eva’s life for the past 12 years with Pink, today she has a rare day off at home in Los Angeles where she met us at her family’s pub and restaurant, The Cat & Fiddle. Located just blocks from the Hollywood Walk of Fame, the British pub has a welcoming and nostalgic feel, which has been preserved by Eva and her family since it resided in its original Laurel Canyon location in the early ’80s. Right on time, Eva appears in the doorway and happily greets us before we post up at a table to talk shop. But her downtime is short-lived, as she hops up to jump behind the bar to pour a couple of beers for some newly arrived patrons before jetting behind the line with her sister, Ashlee, to expedite a pair of tickets ready to go out. Not exactly the kind of behavior you’d expect from a first-call bassist to the stars, but Eva is the furthest thing from a diva. We sit down and start chatting up bass gear, her current tour, and her new journey into self-recording before taking off to check out her home studio and rare gear collection. Stepping into the parking lot, I scan the area trying to locate the dazzling red or pink convertible sports car that one would imagine a pop figure like her to drive, but instead she walks us over to her 1998 Volvo wagon, which appears to have racked up mileage from multiple treks around the globe. “I love this car,” she smiles. “It’s just so damn reliable.” A fitting synopsis — given that Eva’s reliability has made her one of the most in-demand players in music. As we weave through the narrow roads of the Hollywood Hills, she tells stories from her childhood about growing up with a rock-bassist father, Kim Gardner, who toured constantly with his bands The Birds, The Creation and Ashton, Gardner & Dyke. Over the years he also worked with Eric Clapton, George Harrison, Rod Stewart, Bo Diddley, Deep Purple and many others. She starts pointing out houses that belonged to Madonna and her father’s close friend John Entwistle. We pull up to her home to be greeted by her dogs Willow and Holly, who follow her every step as we make our way to her music room. Posters and memorabilia from her many tours with Pink, Gwen Stefani, Cher, Moby, Tegan And Sara, and Veruca Salt line the walls, along with some of her own impressive paintings that she creates when she has the time. But the real treasures lie in her gear room. Numerous stacks of Ampeg rigs, including one of the very first SVTs ever made, fill the room along with a stunning collection of basses. Among them are the ones she inherited from her father, her very first bass that went on to become
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Jon D'Auria   By: Jon D'Auria

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